The journey from raw material to product

A T-shirt
made from organic cotton

Gots certified
Saves resources
Fair payment
Peta Vegan-Approved

How are T-shirts made from organic cotton? What regulations have to be observed for the cotton to be organic? And why are our products made from organic cotton – from the field to the finished product – better for humans and the environment?

Of course, not all products made from organic cotton are produced in the same way. Jeans go through a different process than T-shirts. Here we will show you the entire process for our Bestseller T-Shirt JAAMES – from the beginning, transparent and traceable.

Bäuer*in in Gujarat, Indien bei der Begutachtung der Bio-Baumwollkapseln

Step 1

Cultivation

Our organic cotton is grown according to the regulations of organic farming. This means that less water is consumed and the use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides is forbidden.

Instead, the farmers use manure and compost as fertilisers, which builds up the natural fertility of the soil and its erosion resistance in a circular manner. Crop rotation on a yearly basis is another requirement. By rotating the cultivation of cotton with other crops, pests and diseases are naturally prevented and the soil is further enriched.

The increased share of humus makes the soil not only more fertile, but also capable of storing more water and atmospheric CO2.

Geerntete Bio-Baumwolle vor der Weiterverarbeitung bei unseren Partnern in Gujarat, Indien

Step 2

Harvest

Organic cotton is harvested once a year. In contrast to conventional cotton farming, chemical defoliants that facilitate machine harvesting are prohibited.  

In order to ensure an easier transition from conventional to organic cotton, we founded the ARMEDANGELS Organic Farmers Association in April 2018. This association currently supports more than 500 small-scale farmers in India with the three-year conversion process.


Die entkernte Bio-Baumwolle im Lager unseres Partnerbetriebs in Gujarat, Indien

Step 3

Fiber

Immediately after the harvest, the raw cotton is brought to special processing facilities to separate the cotton fibres from the seed. This process is fully automated with the help of a special machine known as a cotton gin. 

During the entire ginning process, strict controls are upheld to keep the cotton separate according to its quality and farming method (organic or conventional).


Spinnmaschinen in XXXX . Hier wird die Bio-Baumwolle zum festen Faden gesponnen

Step 4

Yarn

During the spinning process, individual short fibres and fibre bundles are brought together to form an even thread or yarn by twisting and pulling them together. What used to be a laborious method carried out by hand using a spinning wheel is now generally a fully automated process.

The finished spun threads are finally wrapped into strands or on cones for further processing.

Vollautomatische Rundstrickmaschinen in XXX. Hier entsteht der Single Jersey Stoff für unser T-Shirt JAAMES

Step 5

Knitting

For our T-shirts made from organic cotton, a single jersey fabric is produced. In contrast to woven fabrics in which two thread systems are interlaced, this is a knitted fabric in which yarn loops are joined together with other yarn loops. 

This process is fully automated on large circular knitting machines that knit many individual strands of yarn into textile jersey fabric.

Wir verwenden ausschließlich GOTS-zertifizierte und toxikologisch geprüfte Färbemittel

Step 6

Dyeing + Finishing

Depending on the textile, dyeing and finishing is carried out at different points in the production process: on the yarn (striped fabrics), the textile fabric or the finished article of clothing (garment dye).

When dyeing textiles in the conventional industry, many chemical products are used and health risks are accepted. Pollutants contained in the dye can be released from the yarn when wearing a T-shirt, enter the body and provoke allergic reactions or diseases of the immune system.

As an alternative, dyes can be used that are permitted under the Global Organic Textile Standard. All colours and chemical agents are toxicologically tested for compliance. Thanks to modern filtration systems, waste water is not contaminated either.

Vor Ort bei unseren Partnern in Portugal, wo die finale Konfektion unserer T-Shirts erfolgt

Step 7

Assembly 

Assembly encompasses the cutting, sewing and finishing of garments. In this process, a 2-dimensional textile fabric becomes a 3-dimensional garment.

The assembly of our organic cotton T-shirt JAAMES is carried out in Portugal at our certified partner facilities. As for all our partners, our conditions here include: fair wages for employees in sewing factories, no child labour, increased safety at the workplace and fewer overtime hours.

A summer dress
made of cellulose

FSC/PEFS zertifizierte Forstwirtschaft
Saves resources
Fair payment
Peta Vegan-Approved

How can a summer dress be made from wood? What has to be done with the raw material to weave it into a dress? And why are our products made from cellulose better for humans and the environment?

Of course, there are many different fibres based on cellulose, each with its own manufacturing process. At the moment, we use four different ecological alternatives to polluting viscose: LENZING™ ECOVERO™, TENCEL™ Lyocell, TENCEL™ Modal, REFIBRA ™. Here we will show you the entire process for our LENZING™ ECOVERO™ Kleid GAELAA – from the beginning, transparent and traceable. 

Wir beziehen unser Holz aus nachhaltiger Forstwirtschaft. Wie hier in XXX

Step 1

Cultivation

More than 99% of the wood used comes from sustainable forestry. Specifically, this means that is certified or controlled in accordance with FSC® (FSC-C041246) and/or PEFC™ (PEFC/06-33-92).

Healthy forest areas have an immense importance for our climate as the most significant reservoirs of CO2. That's why we are committed to proactively protecting endangered forests and jungles even beyond our own wood supply. 

Im Sinn der nachhaltigen Forstwirtschaft nutzt LENZING™ ECOVERO™ Holz, das für andere Verarbeitungszwecke nicht in Frage kommt

Step 2

Wood as a raw material

Our partner, the Lenzing company, specialises in processing wood that cannot be used for other purposes such as making furniture. As a result, their forestry practice is fully in line with the principle of sustainability.

In addition, they ensure that all wood sources are as close as possible to the cellulose processing factory and that the wood is transported in an environmentally friendly manner.

Begutachtung der fertigen LENZING™ ECOVERO™ Fasern bei unserem Partner vor Ort

Step 3

LENZING™ ECOVERO™

The manufacture of LENZING™ ECOVERO™ fibres generates 50% fewer emissions and water pollution when compared to generic viscose.

Furthermore, LENZING™ ECOVERO™ fibres carry the EU Ecolabel. This environmental seal is given to products and services that fulfil strict environmental standards throughout their entire life cycle, i.e. from raw material extraction to manufacture, distribution and disposal. Specifically, this means: LENZING™ ECOVERO™ fibres can always be identified without a doubt in the end product.

Auf Konen gewickelte Fäden bereit zur weiteren Verarbeitung

Step 4

Yarn

During the spinning process, individual short fibres and fibre bundles are brought together to form an even thread or yarn by twisting and pulling them together. What used to be a laborious method carried out by hand using a spinning wheel is now generally a fully automated process.

The finished spun threads are finally wrapped into strands or on cones for further processing.

Vollautomatische Webmaschine bei unseren Partnern in XXX. Hier entsteht der fertige Stoff

Step 5

Weaving

During weaving, two thread systems are crossed at right angles and woven into a textile fabric. Nowadays, this process is carried out by large, fully automated weaving machines. All fabrics that are produced in this manner, regardless of the material used, are referred to as woven fabrics.

Our woven fabric made from LENZING™ ECOVERO™ is characterised by a subtle sheen, silky feel and a beautiful drape. 

Wir verwenden ausschließlich GOTS-zertifizierte und toxikologisch geprüfte Färbemittel

Step 6

Dyeing + Finishing

Depending on the textile, dyeing and finishing is carried out at different points in the production process: on the yarn (striped fabrics), the textile fabric or the finished article of clothing (garment dye).

When dyeing textiles in the conventional industry, many chemical products are used and health risks are accepted. Pollutants contained in the dye can be released from the yarn when wearing a T-shirt, enter the body and provoke allergic reactions or diseases of the immune system.

Because fabrics made of cellulose itself cannot be GOTS certified, we use only dyes approved under GOTS in their processing. So also for all fabric prints.

Vor Ort bei unseren Partnern in Portugal, wo die finale Konfektion unseres Kleids GALEAA stattfindet

Step 7

Assembly

Assembly encompasses the cutting, sewing and finishing of garments. In this process, a 2-dimensional textile fabric becomes a 3-dimensional garment.

The assembly for our LENZING™ ECOVERO™ Dress GALEAA is carried out in Portugal at our certified partner facilities. As for all our partners, our conditions here include: fair wages for employees in sewing factories, no child labour, increased safety at the workplace and fewer overtime hours.

A knitted pullover 
made of organic wool

Gots certified
organic livestock farming
Fair payment
Peta Vegan-Approved

How is a wool pullover produced, from sheep to knitted fabric? What has to be done to the new wool in order to knit it into a finished textile? And why is our wool the most sustainable and animal-friendly in the world?

Of course, not all organic wool products are manufactured in the same way. A cashmere jumper is produced differently from a wool mix pullover. Here we will show you the entire process for our knitted pullover HILARIAA SOFT: from the beginning, transparent and traceable.

Frei grasende Wollschafe in Patagonien

Step 1

Livestock farming

The way we work with animals and prioritise their well-being says everything about their ethical importance to us. Specifically in this area, we found that criteria and key indicators were lacking, which is why we defined our own ARMEDANGELS animal welfare guidelines. In these guidelines, we address animal welfare, land management and social well-being and establish a systematic review in all our supply chains. This also stipulates the conditions under which the sheep and alpacas are kept.

Vor Ort bei unseren Partnern Fuhrmann S.A. in Argentinien, wo die Rohwolle gesammelt wird

Step 2

New wool

We are committed to procuring the most sustainable and animal-friendly wool in the world. That's why we have been collaborating with Fuhrmann S.A. in Argentina since 2015, whose sheep graze on free-range land in Patagonia.

Our sheep's wool is certified according to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), and at the fibre level according to the Responsible Wool Standard (RWS).

We have zero tolerance for mulesing. This is the term for the cruel practice of cutting off large strips of skin from the sheep's buttocks for the purpose of wool extraction.

Moderne Spinnmaschinen. Hier wird die Rohwolle zum festen Garn gesponnen

Step 3

Yarn

During the spinning process, individual short fibres and fibre bundles are brought together to form an even thread or yarn by twisting and pulling them together. This is then wound into balls or strands.

What used to be a laborious method carried out by hand using a spinning wheel is now generally a fully automated process. Using various spinning methods, different qualities of yarn can be produced: soft, firm, voluminous etc.

In order to further reinforce these characteristics, different fibres are often mixed in the yarn. For instance, our HILARIAA SOFT pullover is made of organic wool and organic cotton.

Gefärbte Garnspulen vor der weiteren Verarbeitung in der Türkei

Step 4

Dyeing

Before the knitting process, the yarn is dyed. To this end, the bobbins of yarn are submerged into the dye bath. When dyeing textiles in the conventional industry, many chemical products are used and health risks are accepted. Pollutants contained in the dye can be released when wearing a pullover, enter the body and provoke allergic reactions or diseases of the immune system.

As an alternative, dyes can be used that are permitted under the Global Organic Textile Standard. All colours and chemical agents are toxicologically tested for compliance. Thanks to modern filtration systems, waste water is not contaminated either.

Moderne Flachstrickmaschinen in Istanbul, Türkei. Einzelteile werden hier direkt in die richtige Form gestrickt, um Schnittreste zu minimieren

Step 5

Knitting

Our knitted pullovers are knitted on flat knitting machines. What makes this method unique is that the full textile is not knitted and then cut: instead, the individual sections are knitted directly into the correct shape and can then be sewn together. By using this technique, we are able to minimise waste for all our knit products.

Jeans made of
recycled materials

GRS and organic certified materials
Saves resources
Fair payment
Vegan

How can jeans be made from discarded products? What has to be done with textile waste to produce a new fabric? And why are our recycled products so much better for humans and the environment?

Of course, not all materials are recycled in the same way. There are mechanical and chemical recycling methods. The process of cotton is different than for polyester. Here we will show you how recycled jeans can become a new pair of jeans, our FJELLA CROPPED CIRCULAR – from the beginning, transparent and traceable. 

Einblick bei unseren Partnern in Spanien. Hier werden alle alten Textilien gesammelt und sortiert

Step 1

Old clothing & scraps

With our take-back system, we are closing an important cycle. Old clothing and cutting scraps from our factories are first collected and sorted before being further processed into new high-quality threads.

Our goal in this process is to establish a sustainable circular system that can make our company entirely zero waste by 2030.

You can learn more about our take-back system and how you can participate HERE. 

Ein Faserballen nach der Zerkleinerung in Portugal

Step 2

The fibres

Further processing is carried out at our partner facilities in Portugal and Spain. Here, the textiles are reduced to small pieces in multiple steps until the old material once again consists of loose, fluffy fibres that can be re-spun into firm threads.

Through this process, we use textile waste as an important resource and save valuable fresh fibres. The next step is to produce the ARMEDANGELS circular yarn.

Auf Konen gewickelte Fäden bereit zur weiteren Verarbeitung

Step 3

Yarn

During the spinning process, individual short fibres and fibre bundles are brought together to form an even thread or yarn by twisting and pulling them together. What used to be a laborious method carried out by hand using a spinning wheel is now a fully automated process.

The finished spun threads are finally wrapped into strands or on cones for further processing.

Ungefärbte Garne in der Vorbereitung zur Färbung.

Step 4

Dyeing

When dyeing textiles in the conventional industry, many harmful chemical products are used and health risks are accepted. Pollutants contained in the dye can be released from the yarn when wearing jeans, enter the body and provoke allergic reactions or diseases of the immune system.

As an alternative, dyes can be used that are permitted under the Global Organic Textile Standard. All colours and chemical agents are toxicologically tested for compliance. Thanks to modern filtration systems, waste water is not contaminated either.

Qualitätskontrolle bei unseren Partnern in XXX. Hier werden unsere Denimstoffe gewoben

Step 5

Weaving

During weaving, two thread systems are crossed at right angles and woven into a textile fabric. Nowadays, this process is carried out by large, fully automated weaving machines.

The traditional weaving technique for denim is twill weave, which gives jeans material its sturdy structure and oblique edge. The classic blue-white look with a dark front side and bright back side is created by using a dyed warp yarn and an undyed, raw white weft warn. 

Vor Ort bei unseren Partnern in Tunesien, wo die Konfektion unserer Jeans FJELLA CROPPED erfolgt

Step 6

Assembly

Assembly encompasses the cutting, sewing and finishing of garments. In this process, a 2-dimensional textile fabric becomes a 3-dimensional garment.

The assembly of our FJELLA CROPPED jeans is carried out by our certified partner in Tunisia. As for all our partners, our conditions here include: fair wages for employees in sewing factories, no child labour, increased safety at the workplace and fewer overtime hours.

Durch technische Finishes und moderne Filtrationssysteme verhindern wir eine Belastung des Grundwassers mit Chemikalien

Step 7

Finishing

In the last manufacturing step, the finishing stage, the jeans are given their final look. In conventional production, toxic bleaches and energy-consuming stone washing techniques are used to brighten the original indigo blue and trim the fabric for a used look. This often harms the fabric.

Instead of toxic chlorine and potassium permanganate, we exclusively use GOTS-certified and toxicologically tested chemicals for all denims. In addition, we rely on modern technique such as lasers or ozone wash to further reduce our water consumption and impact.

Care Guide

How to love & last Armedangels clothes

Care Guide

Care Guide

How to love & last Armedangels clothes

Care Guide